07 April 2013

FISH SURVIVES EPIC JOURNEY ACROSS PACIFIC FROM JAPAN TO WASHINGTON IN TSUNAMI WRECKAGE

Two years after Japan's 2011 tsunami, and 5,000 miles away, a striped beakfish (Oplegnathus fasciatuswashed ashore in Washington state in a boat believed to be wreckage from that disaster.
____________________________________________________________________



The little survivor probably ate other stowaways aboard the boat. It now lives in an aquarium in Oregon.

Even more amazing, two other individuals of this species have been spotted in the Mediterranean——twice as fas away——in recent years, possibly arriving as stowaways aboard the sea chests of large ships. What are sea chests? According to an article on the University of Malta website:
  
[M]edium to large sized ships do not pump seawater directly from the sea but from a chamber know as a 'sea chest' which opens to the outside on the ship's hull below the waterline, and in large ships sea chests may hold several cubic metres of seawater. In effect sea chests act like seawater aquaria and provide a means of transport for marine species that does not involve passage through a pump. Although sea chests are protected by grids, these have large openings and are often damaged or dislodged in transit. There are therefore quite plausible ways in which fish of the size of the [striped beakfish] found in Malta could be transported from a source area thousands of kilometres away and be released into the wild in a good state of health.

Fave frame: The ultimate sea chest, with fresh food daily.
  

Post a Comment